I’ve been warned that an earthquake of 7.2 magnitude will hit where I live. The epicenter is a bit far but what if you live on the fault line? Will it be very strong? What happens if there are high-rise buildings on top of a fault line but not directly on the epicenter? Will it fall/topple down? My parents work in high-rise buildings near the fault line. I’m really scared. Thanks 🙂

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80% of the time I don’t think of it, but it does concern me sometimes. I know there is NOTHING I can do about it other than to have some supplies and a first aid kit, but still.

I mean we’re known for massive earthquakes and I was stupid enough to have a look at some pictures before. Now and then, (I’d say about every 3-4 months) I feel almost sick with fear about it. But then i shrug it off since I can’t do anything about it and well I like where I live lol


http://www.geonet.org.nz/images/earthquake/edgecumbe-2-march-1987/lge_edgecumbe_rift_in_paddock.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_earthquakes_in_New_Zealand

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The World-Wide Earthquake Locator aims to provide up-to-date information and detailed dynamic maps of earthquakes across the world within a maximum of 24 hours of their occurence. This web site also includes a database of past earthquakes, an animation of the past month’s earthquakes, and statistical earthquake prediction.

The World-Wide Earthquake Locator was originally developed by Bruce Gittings of the School of GeoScience at the University of Edinburgh in 1995 and it became an early illustration of a real-time Geographical Information System which makes use the internet World-Wide Web and the internet to map dynamic phenomena.

The Locator takes data from the National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC), part of the US Geological Survey, based in Golden, Colorado (USA). This data provides basic information about the location of recent earthquakes and their strength within hours of the events taking place

The World Earthquake locator

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If one earthquake has a magnitude of 5 on the richter scale and a second earthquake has a magnitude of 6 compare the intensities of the two earthquakes.

I know this has something to do with logarithims and the answer is 60 DB, I just dont know how to arrive at the answer, thanks.

Comments (2)

Following Hurricane Katrina in 2005, there became a strong concern in this country
about our ability to cope with natural disasters. Due to the expensive cost of
acquiring detailed data about the hazard before, during and after the event, many
agencies are putting systems forth to allow citizens affected by the events to
contribute details about their surroundings. This may be in the form of data sent
over a mobile phone, or Internet connection to a PC. Please weigh in your thoughts
about using this system as a method of coping with natural disasters by taking this
brief survey.
* 1. Have you ever experienced a natural disaster?
Yes
No
2.
Which of the following hazards have you experienced?
Flood
Hurricane
Earthquake
Fire
Tornado
None
3.
About at what intensity did the disaster occur?
Very low
low
moderate
high
very high
* 4.
Did you have access to the internet following the event
Yes
No
5.
As the event passed, did you feel that adequate updates about the hazard were
provided to affected citizens?
Yes
No
* 6.
Following the event, did you feel coherent enough that you would be able to
communicate in detail about your surroundings?
Yes
No
* 7.
Have you ever contributed Geospatial Information about a hazard or extreme event
online? (Through Google Earth, USGS website, Weather channel, etc..)
Yes
No
* 8.
Do you have any experience using a GPS system?
Yes
No
* 9.
Do you feel that your community has an adequate emergency response system in
place for the onset of natural disasters?
Yes
No
10.
Do you feel that GIS and Remote Sensing is a very appropriate way of coping with a
natural disaster before, during and after the onset of a natural hazard
Yes
No

Comments (1)

Many powerful earthquakes are followed later by less-powerful earthquakes called “aftershocks.”
If an earthquake measures 6 on the Richter scale and is followed by an aftershock that measures 4, how
many times more energy was released in the original earthquake as compared to the aftershock?

Comments (1)

Following Hurricane Katrina in 2005, there became a strong concern in this country
about our ability to cope with natural disasters. Due to the expensive cost of
acquiring detailed data about the hazard before, during and after the event, many
agencies are putting systems forth to allow citizens affected by the events to
contribute details about their surroundings. This may be in the form of data sent
over a mobile phone, or Internet connection to a PC. Please weigh in your thoughts
about using this system as a method of coping with natural disasters by taking this
brief survey.

* 1. Have you ever experienced a natural disaster?
Yes
No
2.
Which of the following hazards have you experienced?
Flood
Hurricane
Earthquake
Fire
Tornado
None
3.
About at what intensity did the disaster occur?
Very low
low
moderate
high
very high
* 4.
Did you have access to the internet following the event
Yes
No
5.
As the event passed, did you feel that adequate updates about the hazard were
provided to affected citizens?
Yes
No
* 6.
Following the event, did you feel coherent enough that you would be able to
communicate in detail about your surroundings?
Yes
No
* 7.
Have you ever contributed Geospatial Information about a hazard or extreme event
online? (Through Google Earth, USGS website, Weather channel, etc..)
Yes
No
* 8.
Do you have any experience using a GPS system?
Yes
No
* 9.
Do you feel that your community has an adequate emergency response system in
place for the onset of natural disasters?
Yes
No
10.
Do you feel that GIS and Remote Sensing is a very appropriate way of coping with a
natural disaster before, during and after the onset of a natural hazard
Yes
No

What state are you located in?

Comments (2)

I keep hearing they’re is gonna be a 6.5 to 7.0 earthquake likely in Southern California; Most likely in the Coachella, Salton Sea area or Chino Hills, Los Angeles area. October 1 2010 98% chance =O &&’d Everyone on twitter is making a big deal :/

Comments (2)

a problem in my physics book went something like this
Earthquakes produce Pwaves and Swaves. Pwaves have a constant velocity of 8km/s and Swaves have constant velocity of 6km/s. If a station records Pwaves and 33seconds later records Swaves, how far away was the earthquake??

Comments (1)

On the news they tell everyone to prepare for the big one all through out california and that it might be a 8.7 earthquake..is that..possible? Omg is that why everyone is moving away?

Comments (5)