Archive for the ‘ Earthquake Questions ’ Category

Shouldnt an earthquake of a 5.4 magnitude be felt by everyone?

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From what I’ve read, this is what happens: The lithosphere is composed of many tectonic plates. When these plates push up against on another due to the force of convection currents in the underlying mantle, pressure builds up until it reaches a breaking point and energy in the form of seismic waves (aka earthquakes) is produced.

Please let me know if this is correct or not! Thanks!

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With the recent earthquake/tsunami in Japan I’ll be flying over seas to help my family (my step-mother’s family) and friends with the disaster. I was wondering where I could get some free online lessons to help me get around over there. Podcasts, printouts etc etc any info you can give would be great thanks (:

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I was wondering how they use seismic waves to determine the thickness of the crust? The only way I know they use seismic waves to figure something out is because there are p waves and s waves, and s waves do not travel through liquid, proving that the outercore is molten because far away stations cannot record the s waves but can the p waves right? idk help me out 😛

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So our thesis statement is supposed to be 1 sentence long, and contain 3 main points that we will cover in our paper. Do you think semicolon use acceptable? vv

Since the earthquake, pictures and videos from Haiti have stunned millions all over the world; stories of illness, abused women, and orphaned children have tugged peoples’ heartstrings, inspiring them to do all they can to help.

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I want a chansey with Seismic Toss in my battle subway team, but I don’t know how to get Seismic Toss on my chansey.

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NASA is sending another voyage to the moon. How can the use of seismic equipment recording “moon quakes” be used to create a model of the moon?

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I am doing a report on this and I can not seem to find what type of fault line it occurred on. I have tried Wikipedia but I can not find anything.

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So if you go to the USGS website and upload the earthquake page, how current is the data? Do the seismographic monitors constantly upload data to the site, making it real-time; or is it only current to within a day?

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A tsunami saved the Greek village of Potidaea from Persian invaders in winter 479 BC, a German study said Thursday, warning that the area remains prone to earthquakes.

New geological evidence suggests that the region could still face tsunami events like the one that drowned hundreds of Persian invaders as they lay siege to the ancient Greek village many centuries ago, according to Klaus Reicherter of Aachen University in Germany and his colleagues.

 

Sediment on the northern Greek peninsula where Potidaea, and its modern counterpart Nea Potidea, is located showed signs of massive marine events, such as large waves, the study said.

And excavations in the suburbs of the nearby ancient city of Mende uncovered a high-energy level dating back to the fifth century BC that contained far older sea shells likely plucked from the ocean bed and tossed about during a tsunami.

The event was previously described by Greek historian Herodotus.

Reicherter said the study’s findings suggested that the Thermaic Gulf where the peninsula is located — a densely populated area that is also a tourist destination — should be included in Greece’s tsunami-prone regions.

He was due to present his research Thursday at the annual meeting of the Seismological Society of America in San Diego, California. [AFP]

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